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January 20, 2013

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Jon, I have to agree with your assessments of MLK, however my attempts to find him interesting never came to fruition. My interests gravitated more to Malcom X, Angela Davis, Huey Newton and Rosie Parks.

I read an article describing the Sunday service that President Obama attended before he went to his required taking of the oath of office. The pictorial insert brought the words to life in a way that was, for me, powerful, as the full congregation rose to the prayer and the intent to move ‘forward’.

M.L.King had a coalescing voice, a voice that moved the arc to bend toward justice. For that he can be admired. He needed lots of help, roles played out by supporting personalities that rarely receive the recognition they too deserve. Thank you, cal Lash, for mentioning Rosa Parks ‘the first lady of the civil rights movement’. I will also give a shout out to Harriet Tubman and Harriet Beecher Stowe.
I love how fate sometimes moves in “poetic” ways.

Thanks for this post.

And good on Lupe Fiasco.

Thank you, Jon. I find myself feeling overwhelmed and especially powerless to effect change these days. I don't know if it's permanent or the sign of temporary burnout that comes with being an activist in Phoenix. I'm not a huge fan of Cornel West's delivery (I find it distracting from his message), but someone posted a video of his remarks regarding President Obama's use of MLK's Bible for the swearing in ceremony. His points matched yours. I agree.

For several years, I attended the Phoenix MLK breakfast as a member of the Human Relations Commission. It is unsettling (to say the least) to see corporate underwriting of tables, spun as proof of that company's commitment to "diversity", and backslapping among community leaders who, frankly, gave up on the message of economic justice long ago for happy talk and complicity in sanitizing Dr. King's message into a drive for community volunteering.

I came across a Kook site yesterday crowing about MLK's registration as a Republican and how he would fully support the Tea-Bagger agenda and the fight for the 2nd Amendment too! For me it was disgusting how little thought -- historical, racial, social, economic -- was on display.

Yeesh, e-dog - these people have no shame, do they?

Thanks Jon! Frequently, I'm reminded about how many folks can't get past their deep-seated prejudice about a black man in "their" White House. Let's hope President O actually turns out to be transformational vs. a latter day version of Gumby!

Color must become a non issue.
A two minute read of the FP article
on the Front Page is enough to set aside the DC crap of the last 12 years and pay attention to problems that are tantamount to survival regardless of color.

cal: there's a song, "You've Got to be Taught to Hate" which may sound negative but explains a lot. Sort of a sequel to Kermit's "It's Not Easy Being Green".

My grandchildren are color-blind . . . always have been. Grand-daughter's recent 10th birthday party had girls from all descriptions with names I could hardly pronounce. Looked like the junior UN to me!

Why did I think this column would generate more than 8 responses plus my two?

Cal,

I knew that FAUX news viewers were dumb as rocks, but the dialogue on that channel ever since the shooting of all those little kids has me so upset with the willfully ignorant of this country that any comment is just like farting into a hurricane of stupidity. I don't think the brain damage can be undone. And just think about this, the children of the FAUX news views are dumber than their parents.

Anyway, that's comment 12.

AZ Reb, Re MLK, moving speeshes and the black religious community.
My girl friend and I went to Changing Hands book store yesterday to browse and for lunch.
I could not pass up the small tome, "Religion for Atheists by Alain de Bolton after I read the last line in the book.

"Religions are intermittently too useful, effective and intelligent to be abandoned to the religious alone."

and it has some really good photos and one liners.
For example a photo of a Black Southern Baptist singing and prayer service with a statement. "Could a lecture on Walt Whitman be as moving?"

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